TUESDAY TALENT

geelovestowrite discovered a rising figure in the poetry community…

Kevin Young…

(born November 8, 1970) is an American poet and teacher of poetry. Young graduated from Harvard College in 1992.  His work is strongly influenced by Langston Hughes,  Emily Dickinson, John Berryman and  artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.  Young is currently the director of  the  Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.  He has written eleven books on poetry and has won various awards.  Young’s latest nonfiction novel, Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts, and Fake News  will be released November 2017.  The Washington Post deemed Young- “One of the most important poets of his generation.”

Young will also take on the role of Poetry Editor of The New Yorker in November 2017.

Some of his works are:

Blues Poems

Jazz Poems

Jelly Roll: a blues

Source: Wikipedia &  kevinyoungpoetry.com

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TUESDAY TALENT

geelovestowrite presents the notable…

Richard Nathaniel Wright

 

(September 4, 1908 – November 28, 1960) was an American author of sometimes controversial novels, short stories, poems, and non-fiction. Much of his literature concerns racial themes, especially related to the plight of African Americans during the late 19th to mid-20th centuries, who suffered discrimination and violence in the South and the North. Literary critics believe his work helped change race relations in the United States in the mid-20th century.

 

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Source: Wikipedia

WRITE-IT WEDNESDAY

“Le sporting-club de Monte Carlo (for Lena Horne)”lena-horne

The lady is a tramp
a camp
a lamp

The lady is a sight
a might
a light
the lady devastated
an alley or two
reverberated through the valley
which leads to me, and you

the lady is the apple
of God’s eye:
He’s cool enough about it
but He tends to strut a little
when she passes by

the lady is a wonder
daughter of the thunder
smashing cages
legislating rages
with the voice of ages
singing us through.
-James Baldwinballoons

6-months-anniversary-updated

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********DON’T FORGET TO SUBMIT YOUR INSPIRATIONAL WRITING IMAGE…CONTEST ENDS AT 11:59 PM EST*********GOOD LUCK!

 

WRITE-IT WEDNESDAY

write [rahyt]  verb write
1. To form letters, characters, or words on a surface with an instrument:
engross, indite, inscribe, scribe.
2. To form by artistic effort:
compose, create, indite, produce.
3. To be the author of (a published work or works):
pen, publish.

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TUESDAY TALENT

Emily Dickinson      emily-dickinson

Emily Dickinson was born on 10th December, 1830, in the town of Amherst, Massachusetts.  Emily wrote unique poetry often questioning immortality and death.  She enjoyed being alone and became know for secluding herself from society.  Emily began writing at a young age and her work entertained her classmates.  It was difficult for her to write because her father was strict and censored most of Dickinson’s writing and reading material.  Emily attended college but became ill.  Her father returned her home and she eventually became a total recluse.  She wrote over 1700 poems as well as many letters in several different languages.  Many thought that her poetry reflected thoughts of an imaginary lover.  It was never proven, however, there was talk that she had a relationship with an older gentleman (Judge Otis Lord-quite her senior and respected in the community).

Emily Dickinson died at the age of 55 from Bright’s disease, which is caused by kidney degeneration.  After her death her sister Vinnie found Emily’s poetry and went on to have them published, “The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson” in 1893.

My life closed twice before its close.
It yet remains to see
If immortality unveil
A third event to me,
So huge, so hopeless to conceive
As these that twice befell,
Parting is all we know of heaven,
And all we need of hell.
-Emily Dickinson

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TUESDAY TALENT

geelovestowrite is honored to feature Phillis Wheatley.

A matriarch in the poetry world.  She paved the way for me and other women writers.  Wheatley was the first published African American poet as well as the first women to be published.  She was born in Gambia, West Africa in 1753.  She was purchased by the Wheatley family at the age of 7.  The Wheatley family taught her how to read and write.  Surprisingly, they encouraged her poetry.

In 1778, Wheatley was legally freed from slavery after her master’s death, by the terms of her master’s will.  Unfortunately, Phillis died just 6 years later.  Here is one of Wheatley poems that describe her journey of crossing the ocean and becoming enslaved in America:

phillis_wheatley

Phillis Wheatley

Twas mercy brought me from my Pagan land,
Taught my benighted soul to understand
That there’s a God, that there’s a Saviour too:
Once I redemption neither sought nor knew.
Some view our sable race with scornful eye,
“Their colour is a diabolic dye.”
Remember, Christians, Negroes, black as Cain,
May be refin’d, and join th’ angelic train.

Wheatley tried to get more of her works published but due her husband, John Peters, debt she was unable.  After her death some of her works from her second volume of poems were published.

The Phillis Wheatley YMCA in Washington, D.C. is named for her.

 

Source: wikipedia.org

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